Kids' Commute

Join Classical IPR's Kate Botello each weekday morning at about 7:40 as she picks stories and sounds from the Classical world your children will love. She wants to inspire your family with the love of Classical music.

Here's the basic idea - it's likely you're listening to Classical IPR in the car while driving your kids to school. If so, they're what we like to call the, "captive audience." Kate selects music for their education and (hopefully!) enjoyment.

On the Kids' Commute, we explore Classical music by different themes - we've studied Composers A to Z, Classical music from around the world, music about animals - everything you can think of! We've explored ballets, their stories, and the music that goes along with them ("Sleeping Beauty," and "Cinderella," for instance), along with time-honored classics like Sergei Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf."

Join us weekday mornings for the Kids' Commute - no Kid or Commute required!

Kate loves to hear from kids. Send her feedback, or make a request.

Hear your kids' voices on the Kids' Commute. Find out how.

Kids' Commute: The Carnival of the Animals

Jun 5, 2015

It’s the final week of the school year! It’s become a tradition here on the Kids’ Commute to celebrate the last week of school with The Carnival of the Animals, by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. We’ll hear Leonard Bernstein conduct, and also describe every movement of the musical suite for us. Let’s jump right in!

The Carnival of the Animals was written in 1886. The piece is a sort of zoo, where Camille Saint-Saëns describes all sorts of different animals musically! Saint-Saëns wrote the music for his friends to enjoy, but also to give young musicians something fun to play. 

So, throughout the zoological romp this week, we’ll hear 7 young people performing alongside the string section of the New York Philharmonic.

 

Kids' Commute: The Carnival of the Animals

Jun 4, 2015
Hear "The Carnival of the Animals" this week on Kids' Commute!
David Monniaux

It’s the final week of the school year! It’s become a tradition here on the Kids’ Commute to celebrate the last week of school with The Carnival of the Animals, by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. We’ll hear Leonard Bernstein conduct, and also describe every movement of the musical suite for us. Let’s jump right in!

The Carnival of the Animals was written in 1886. The piece is a sort of zoo, where Camille Saint-Saëns describes all sorts of different animals musically! Saint-Saëns wrote the music for his friends to enjoy, but also to give young musicians something fun to play. 

So, throughout the zoological romp this week, we’ll hear 7 young people performing alongside the string section of the New York Philharmonic.

 


Kids' Commute: The Carnival of the Animals

Jun 3, 2015

It’s the final week of the school year! It’s become a tradition here on the Kids’ Commute to celebrate the last week of school with The Carnival of the Animals, by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. We’ll hear Leonard Bernstein conduct, and also describe every movement of the musical suite for us. Let’s jump right in!

The Carnival of the Animals was written in 1886. The piece is a sort of zoo, where Camille Saint-Saëns describes all sorts of different animals musically! Saint-Saëns wrote the music for his friends to enjoy, but also to give young musicians something fun to play. 

 


Kids' Commute: The Carnival of the Animals

Jun 2, 2015

It’s the final week of the school year! It’s become a tradition here on the Kids’ Commute to celebrate the last week of school with The Carnival of the Animals, by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. We’ll hear Leonard Bernstein conduct, and also describe every movement of the musical suite for us. Let’s jump right in!

The Carnival of the Animals was written in 1886. The piece is a sort of zoo, where Camille Saint-Saëns describes all sorts of different animals musically! Saint-Saëns wrote the music for his friends to enjoy, but also to give young musicians something fun to play. 

 


Kids' Commute: The Carnival of the Animals

Jun 1, 2015

It’s the final week of the school year! It’s become a tradition here on the Kids’ Commute to celebrate the last week of school with The Carnival of the Animals, by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. We’ll hear Leonard Bernstein conduct, and also describe every movement of the musical suite for us. Let’s jump right in!

The Carnival of the Animals was written in 1886. The piece is a sort of zoo, where Camille Saint-Saëns describes all sorts of different animals musically! 

 


Kids' Commute: Summer week - Glazunov

May 29, 2015
Celebrate summer this week on Kids' Commute!
Carpe Diem Photography

It’s summer week on Kids’ Commute! 
Throughout the week, we’ll be celebrating summer with the music of Antonio Vivaldi, Ástor Piazzolla, and Alexander Glazunov. All these composers wrote specific, compositions about the sunny, warm season. Are you ready for summer.

Today, we’re celebrating summer in Russia. Around 1900, Alexander Glazunov composed a ballet called, The Seasons, which celebrates the four different seasons of the year. Of course today, we will hear the Summer movement. 

 


Kids' Commute: Summer week - Glazunov

May 29, 2015
Celebrate summer this week on Kids' Commute!
Carpe Diem Photography

It’s summer week on Kids’ Commute! Throughout the week, we’ll be celebrating summer with the music of Antonio Vivaldi, Ástor Piazzolla, and Alexander Glazunov. All these composers wrote specific, compositions about the sunny, warm season. Are you ready for summer.

Today, we’re celebrating summer in Russia. Around 1900, Alexander Glazunov composed a ballet called, The Seasons, which celebrates the four different seasons of the year. Of course today, we will hear the Summer movement. 

 

Kids' Commute: Summer week - Piazzolla

May 28, 2015
Celebrate summer this week on Kids' Commute!
Carpe Diem Photography

It’s summer week on Kids’ Commute! Throughout the week, we’ll be celebrating summer with the music of Antonio Vivaldi, Ástor Piazzolla, and Alexander Glazunov. All these composers wrote specific, compositions about the sunny, warm season. Are you ready for summer?

Like we did during “Spring has sprung” week here on the Kids’ Commute, we are once again going to take a trip south to the beautiful capital city of Argentina, Buenos Aires. 

Ástor Piazzolla is a very famous composer of tango music. Tango music is a form of dance music that originated in South America. 

 


Kids' Commute: Summer week - Vivaldi part III

May 27, 2015
Celebrate summer this week on Kids' Commute!
Carpe Diem Photography

It’s summer week on Kids’ Commute! Throughout the week, we’ll be celebrating summer with the music of Antonio Vivaldi, Ástor Piazzolla, and Alexander Glazunov. All these composers wrote specific, compositions about the sunny, warm season. Are you ready for summer?

Do you remember Antonio Vivaldi, from “Spring has sprung” week on Kids’ Commute? 

He was a Catholic priest who is more famous for writing music. His most famous music is a collection of violin concertos called, The Four Seasons, which he wrote all the way back in 1725. If you can recall, he wrote a series of poems about the different seasons, and then set them to music.

 

Kids' Commute: Summer week - Vivaldi part II

May 26, 2015
Celebrate summer this week on Kids' Commute!
Carpe Diem Photography

It’s summer week on Kids’ Commute! Throughout the week, we’ll be celebrating summer with the music of Antonio Vivaldi, Ástor Piazzolla, and Alexander Glazunov. All these composers wrote specific, compositions about the sunny, warm season. Are you ready for summer?

Do you remember Antonio Vivaldi, from “Spring has sprung” week on Kids’ Commute? 

He was a Catholic priest who is more famous for writing music. His most famous music is a collection of violin concertos called, The Four Seasons, which he wrote all the way back in 1725. If you can recall, he wrote a series of poems about the different seasons, and then set them to music.

 


Kids' Commute: Summer week - Vivaldi part I

May 25, 2015
Celebrate summer this week on Kids' Commute!
Carpe Diem Photography

It’s summer week on Kids’ Commute! Throughout the week, we’re celebrating summer with the music of Antonio Vivaldi, Ástor Piazzolla, and Alexander Glazunov. All these composers wrote specific, compositions about our favorite sunny, warm season. Are you ready for summer?

Do you remember Antonio Vivaldi, from “Spring has sprung” week on Kids’ Commute? 

He was a Catholic priest who is more famous for writing music. His most famous music is a collection of violin concertos called, The Four Seasons, which he wrote all the way back in 1725. If you can recall, he wrote a series of poems about the different seasons, and then set them to music.

Well, today we are going to talk about the first movement of his composition, Summer.

 

This week on the Kids’ Commute, we’re exploring the Mother Goose Suite, by Maurice Ravel. We’ll hear David Ogden Stiers narrate some of the text from the stories of Mother Goose, and get to listen to the music associated with each story...Sleeping Beauty, Tom Thumb, Beauty and the Beast, and more! 

So, are you ready for some stories? 

French composer Maurice Ravel wrote the Mother Goose Suite in 1910. 

He took several fairy tales, and then wrote the related music not for children to just listen to, but to perform. The suite of music was originally written as a piano duet for two children named Mimi and Jean, ages 6 and 7.

 


This week on the Kids’ Commute, we’re exploring the Mother Goose Suite, by Maurice Ravel. We’ll hear David Ogden Stiers narrate some of the text from the stories of Mother Goose, and get to listen to the music associated with each story...Sleeping Beauty, Tom Thumb, Beauty and the Beast, and more! 

So, are you ready for some stories? 

French composer Maurice Ravel wrote the Mother Goose Suite in 1910. 

He took several fairy tales, and then wrote the related music not for children to just listen to, but to perform. The suite of music was originally written as a piano duet for two children named Mimi and Jean, ages 6 and 7.

 


This week on the Kids’ Commute, we’re exploring the Mother Goose Suite, by Maurice Ravel. We’ll hear David Ogden Stiers narrate some of the text from the stories of Mother Goose, and get to listen to the music associated with each story...Sleeping Beauty, Tom Thumb, Beauty and the Beast, and more! 

So, are you ready for some stories? 

French composer Maurice Ravel wrote the Mother Goose Suite in 1910. He took several fairy tales, and then wrote the related music not for children to just listen to, but to perform. The suite of music was originally written as a piano duet for two children named Mimi and Jean, ages 6 and 7.

 


Kids' Commute: Mother Goose Suite - Tom Thumb

May 19, 2015

This week on the Kids’ Commute, we’re exploring the Mother Goose Suite, by Maurice Ravel. We’ll hear David Ogden Stiers narrate some of the text from the stories of Mother Goose, and get to listen to the music associated with each story...Sleeping Beauty, Tom Thumb, Beauty and the Beast, and more! 

So, are you ready for some stories? 

French composer Maurice Ravel wrote the Mother Goose Suite in 1910. He took several fairy tales, and then wrote the related music not for children to just listen to, but to perform. The suite of music was originally written as a piano duet for two children named Mimi and Jean, ages 6 and 7.

 


  This week on the Kids’ Commute, we’re exploring the Mother Goose Suite, by Maurice Ravel. We’ll hear David Ogden Stiers narrate some of the text from the stories of Mother Goose, and get to listen to the music associated with each story...Sleeping Beauty, Tom Thumb, Beauty and the Beast, and more! 

So, are you ready for some stories? 

French composer Maurice Ravel wrote the Mother Goose Suite in 1910. He took several fairy tales, and then wrote the related music not for children to just listen to, but to perform. The suite was originally written as a piano duet for two children named Mimi and Jean, ages 6 and 7.

 


The Kids' Commute: The King and I - Shall We Dance?

May 14, 2015

This weekend, Interlochen Arts Academy is putting on the musical, The King and I.

To celebrate, Kate Botello is walking us through five of her favorite parts of the Rodgers and Hammerstein show, on Kids’ Commute.

The King and I, is based on the 1944 novel, Anna and the King of Siam, by Margaret Landon.  Turns out that novel was based on the diaries of a lady named Anna Leonowens, who was a schoolteacher from England in the early 1860’s. Anna was hired by King Mongkut of Siam (now Thailand) to teach scientific, and modern knowledge to his many royal children.


Kids' Commute: The King and I - A Puzzlement

May 12, 2015

This weekend, Interlochen Arts Academy is putting on the musical, The King and I

To celebrate, Kate Botello is walking us through five of her favorite parts of the Rodgers and Hammerstein show, on Kids’ Commute.

The King and I, is based on the 1944 novel, Anna and the King of Siam, by Margaret Landon.  Turns out that novel was based on the diaries of a lady named Anna Leonowens, who was a schoolteacher from England in the early 1860’s. Anna was hired by King Mongkut of Siam (now Thailand) to teach scientific, and modern knowledge to his many royal children.

 


Kids' Commute: The King and I - Getting to Know You

May 12, 2015

This weekend, Interlochen Arts Academy is putting on the musical, The King and I

To celebrate, Kate Botello is walking us through five of her favorite parts of the Rodgers and Hammerstein show, on Kids’ Commute.

The King and I, is based on the 1944 novel, Anna and the King of Siam, by Margaret Landon.  Turns out that novel was based on the diaries of a lady named Anna Leonowens, who was a schoolteacher from England in the early 1860’s. Anna was hired by King Mongkut of Siam (now Thailand) to teach scientific, and modern knowledge to his many royal children.

Today, we are going to hear Anna teach her first lesson to the royal children. 

 


This weekend, Interlochen Arts Academy is putting on the musical, The King and I

To celebrate, Kate Botello is walking us through five of her favorite parts of the Rodgers and Hammerstein show, on Kids’ Commute.

The King and I, is based on the 1944 novel, Anna and the King of Siam, by Margaret Landon.  Turns out that novel was based on the diaries of a lady named Anna Leonowens, who was a schoolteacher from England in the early 1860’s. Anna was hired by King Mongkut of Siam (now Thailand) to teach scientific, and modern knowledge to his many royal children.

 

Kids' Commute: Weird Instruments - Didgeridoo

May 8, 2015

This week on Kids’ Commute, get ready for some weirdness! From the Sackbut, to the Hurdy-Gurdy, to the Theremin, to the Didgeridoo, we’re going to have fun exploring some of the craziest and weirdest instruments on the planet! 

Are you ready to get “weirded out?!”

The didgeridoo is the oldest instrument we’ve highlighted this week. Native Australians called aborigines invented the didgeridoo over 1500 years ago. 

 


Kids' Commute: Weird Instruments - Theremin

May 7, 2015

This week on Kids’ Commute, get ready for some weirdness! From the Sackbut, to the Hurdy-Gurdy, to the Theremin, to the Celesta, we’re going to have fun exploring some of the craziest and weirdest instruments on the planet! 

Are you ready to get “weirded out?!”

The theremin is named after it’s inventor, Léon Theremin, who invented the instrument in 1928. Now as you can see from the picture above, the theremin doesn’t look like a musical instrument at all, but instead sort of looks like a radio. It’s a box, with dials, and a couple of antenna on the sides. 

 


Kids' Commute: Weird Instruments - Celesta

May 6, 2015

This week on Kids’ Commute, get ready for some weirdness! From the Sackbut, to the Hurdy-Gurdy, to the Theremin, to the Celesta, we’re going to have fun exploring some of the craziest and weirdest instruments on the planet! 

Are you ready to get “weirded out?!”

The celesta was invented in Paris in the late 1800’s, by a man named Auguste Mustel.
It comes from the French word “celeste,” which means “heavenly.” 

 

Kids' Commute: Weird Instruments - Hurdy-Gurdy

May 5, 2015

This week on Kids’ Commute, get ready for some weirdness! From the Sackbut, to the Hurdy-Gurdy, to the Theremin, we’re going to have fun exploring some of the craziest and weirdest instruments on the planet! 

Are you ready to get “weirded out?!”

The hurdy-gurdy is another very old instrument. It was popular during the Renaissance Period about 500 years ago. It is a crazy looking instrument! In a weird way, it’s kind of a combination between a fiddle, an accordion, and a music box.   

Did you know the hurdy-gurdy kind of sounds like a bagpipe. In fact, you can play any bagpipe music with a hurdy-gurdy because it sounds so similar.

 


Kids' Commute: Weird Instruments - Sackbut

May 5, 2015

This week on Kids’ Commute, get ready for some weirdness! From the Sackbut, to the Hurdy-Gurdy, to the Theremin, we’re going to have fun exploring some of the craziest and weirdest instruments on the planet! 

Are you ready to get “weirded out?!”

The sackbut is a very old form of a trombone. It’s so old, that it dates back to the 1400’s. Like a trombone, the sackbut has a slider, a long piece of metal that you push back and forth. This either shortens or extends the tubes of the instrument, thereby changing the pitch of the instrument. 


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